Conservatism and the End of the World

This week in The New Inquiry William Osterweil explores the recently prevalent “Ancient Apocalypse” film and TV genre. From Gladiator to Apocalypto to Noah to an endless shambling parade of zombie films, an Ancient Apocalypse doesn’t depict the literal end of the world, but situates its heroes at the end of an age, the downfall of a quasi-historical civilization. Osterweil explains:

There is a subnational social group: a tribe, city-state or family, living, if not happily, at least in stability and relative peace. That group receives a prophecy of a coming apocalypse. The prophecy proves true almost immediately, though it refers to the end of the world only insofar as it is the end of the group as currently constituted, the end of the group’s forms of life, the group’s world. This end is violent, sudden, and comes from the outside, in the form of natural disaster, foreign hordes, or rival groups with better technology—although its effects are exacerbated by internal decadence, corruption, weakness, willful ignorance, and/or betrayal.

At first blush, these apocalyptic fantasies may seem to promote conservative values. They feature strong heroic individuals who win survival or glory against all odds in the burning debris of a collapsed civilization. Continue reading Conservatism and the End of the World

The Impossibility of Conservatism; or, Why I am a Reactionary

Part 3 of 3 (see also parts one and two)

All good things come to an end, they say, and so must this series on the limits of Burkean conservatism. First, we discussed how the landscape of tradition has changed: what was revolutionary and inimical to the great heritage of mankind has since become “traditional” while even more radically progressive features dot the minds of many men. Thus, the moderate change championed by fair Edmund would simply be part of the problem—to assert the truth, goodness, and beauty with which Burke himself was trying to preserve makes one into a sort of radical himself, often contrary to the tastes and policies of his immediate predecessors. Similarly, we looked at Chesterton’s critique, where there’s a sort of Social 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. We must not simply accept evolutionary politics—if something is a universal truth or goodness, then it needs to be restored, often against the tide of fans of moderating inertia. In many ways, the eternal God and His Law cannot be kicked out of the equation. One sometimes has to willfully fight against a kind of political and social entropy—a practice that is not easily gathered from Burke’s corpus of thought.

On the other hand, something has changed through history. I am different from the ancient as well as the medieval man, in a way similar to how I am different from a foreigner. What has changed—especially for Western contemporary man—when contrasted with his ancestors? Continue reading The Impossibility of Conservatism; or, Why I am a Reactionary

JULY 2012 ISSUE

Vol. 1, No. 6: July 2012

Introducing the “Old Fogey Rehabilitation Project”  Holgrave

ESSAYS

Roman Exceptionalism  Robert “Brutus” Yates

Democracy and Absolutism: Early-Modern Twins  Holgrave

Patriotism (A Meditation on Independence Day)  Sordello

Memory and Gratitude (A Meditation on Memorial Day)  Sordello

The Impossibility of Conservatism; or, Why I am a Reactionary, pt. 2  Bede Adulescens

CRITICISM

A SYMPOSIUM ON “AMERICAN EXCEPTIONALISM”

The Elusive American Mission — Holgrave

Taking Exception to Exceptionalism — N.W. Smith

Religion Holds a Central Place  Bede Adulescens

COMMONPLACES

Matthew Arnold on Winning the Culture War  Holgrave

The Tory Slide, ft. Dostoyevsky & Matthew Arnold  Holgrave

Game of Moans: A review of Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin  N.W. Smith

LAST THOUGHTS

Russian Exceptionalism — from Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Demons